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Scott Murray @scott
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“The Beloved Community License” is the most radical thing I've read all year. douglass.io/the-bcl

@scott It reads pretty radical, but..

There's no code to be found.

The closest I can come to finding code is douglass.io links to gitsoul.com which hosts two repositories: BCL and Tubman

The Tubman repository has no code, but shows a screenshot of the tubman.io site, and contains a BCL file, indicating that it's meant to licensed under BCL.

But visiting the tubman.io site, uBlock origin blocks a bunch of tracking domains including "google-analytics.com" == surveillance.

Not impressive.

@scott Also, there are no names of living people mentioned anywhere. Even the contact mail and the gitsoul username is names of dead black activists.

Very fancy facade, no way to tell what's behind the curtain - feels very much like a scam to me, despite all the nice words.

@scott Oh, and the image representing "Josephine Decentralized Video"* is a screencap of a google doodle from last year.

(last slide of this:)
google.com/doodles/josephine-b

*) one of many advertised features/apps with nothing else than a name mentioned once on the whole site.

@zatnosk hmm good points. I tried to look up who was behind it and also hit a wall. Too bad! Also weird that it seems to be a company selling a physical server (with weird specs) and not a true open source outfit. I'll ask around!

@scott Crockford’s No Evil license was a huge disaster. He released some important software with MIT plus a “used only for good, not evil” clause and nobody wanted to use it because who knows what would violate such a license. Best to release software and deal with the evil things people do with it later.

@22 I had not heard of that. Thanks for the reference!

@scott I love the idea of this but while I think I get what they mean by software not doing surveillance, I have no idea what, legally, it would mean for software not to do surveillance and whether or not any network-connected anything can live up to that.

@c25l_ yes, totally. It's very, shall we say, vague and open to interpretation. :)